Resume Template: SQL Developer

Every enterprise that is dependent upon computers and software applications requires continual oversight and maintenance by professionals – people who know the ropes of computing languages and infrastructures. As an SQL Developer, that’s where you come in. You will be tasked with creating solutions and analysis for clients utilizing your expertise, but you need to be hired first! This is where we come in. The following article is intended to help you with fashioning a great resume that will attract the attention of potential clients and employers. We’ll show you everything you need to know about effective resume writing. There is a certain “language” one should know when approaching the task of creating a resume.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample SQL developer resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best SQL developer resume you possibly can.

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SQL Developer Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Robert Warren
[email protected]
1 (720) 284-0363
Denver, CO 80231
linkedin.com/robertwarren

Summary Statement:

SQL Developer: Motivated SQL Developer with broad skill-set in the field, including development, testing, and production environments. Experienced with implementing database analysis solutions, reporting, custom user interfaces, and application development.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • SQL, T-SQL, PL/SQL, XML
  • DTS/SSIS Tools
  • ETL Process
  • C# Programming Language
  • Evaluation
  • Critical Thinking
  • Troubleshooting
  • Planning

Professional Experience:

Alpine Solutions | Denver, CO
SQL Developer | October 2016 – Present

  • Design, build, and implement relational databases
  • Test databases for optimal performance
  • Produce documentation on all assigned systems and databases
  • Share knowledge with internal IT teams and make recommendations

Denver Pharma Group | Denver, CO
SQL Developer | June 2014 – August 2016

  • Performed data mapping, data transformation, and loading data to target system
  • Employed ETL and T-SQL skills for system and process analysis
  • Executed custom ETL packages using SSIS
  • Created data file extractions and scripts for imports
  • Gathered data requirements from clients and produced detailed data maps

RM Technologies | Denver, CO
SQL Developer | September 2011 – April 2014

  • Improved and maintained existing processes within company’s analytics platform
  • Implemented SQL solutions within ETL process
  • Analyzed large data sets using SQL and associated data tools
  • Complied with all relevant HIPAA and security regulations

Education/Certifications

Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems (CIS)

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
Class of 2011

Formatting

Proper formatting is essential.

Your SQL developer resume should not be a loose collection of your skills and experience tossed onto a page with no rhyme or reason.

Rather, your resume should be a highly structured document that is tailor-made and designed to attract the attention of hiring managers.

It’s a tall order these days, seeing how many employers now use scanning bots to look resume submissions over for proper language and keyword usage.

And once your SQL developer resume gets past the bots it will have to compete for the attention of a busy hiring manager, who will only spend an average of 6 seconds reading it.

So how do you overcome these probable obstacles and create a winning resume?

Again, proper formatting!

Use reverse chronological order layout when writing your work experience. Doing this will put your most recent experience and accomplishments first, which is a good way to draw in the reader.

Select a sensible and ordered font to work with – nothing fancy or outlandish.

Keep an eye on your white spaces. You want them balanced with your text in order to present a clean and professional looking resume.

Writing Your Resume Summary

It’s crucial to get your skills in front of the reader as soon as possible

This is why we recommend starting things off with a summary of your best skills and expertise.

Really try and impress with this section!

Use 2-3 sentences to sum up your top qualities as an SQL developer.

Avoid generalities and get specific about your value as a candidate.

A well-written summary is your surest way of attracting and keeping the interest of the reader (your potential employer).

PRO TIP: Your summary should not be a breakdown of your career thus far or a description of former jobs. Rather it should be a tight collection of those skills that make you stand out.

In order to get your summary working just right, here are a few examples to study:

Yes!

Motivated SQL Developer with broad skill-set in the field, including development, testing, and production environments. Experienced with implementing database analysis solutions, reporting, custom user interfaces, and application development.

No!

SQL Developer with a lot of knowledge about SQL. I can solve problems and make solutions for your company. My skills can meet all your computer language needs.

The first summary is a concise, but specific, example of the candidate’s top skills and areas of strength.

The reader is able to grasp the value and potential of the candidate.

Our second example is what you don’t want in a summary. The language is unprofessional and lacks focus.

No specifics are provided regarding the candidate’s actual skills and value.

Your summary should be your introduction as a professional so it’s important to include all the relevant details.

Areas of Expertise/Key Accomplishments

To further demonstrate your expertise as an SQL Developer, create a list of your Key Accomplishments, or Areas of Expertise.

This list will complement your summary.

Keep in mind as you write that your skills are what set you apart as a candidate. They make you unique, especially if you have demonstrated proficiency in a certain area that maybe is not common among other candidates.

Format your skills list with bullet points.

Example:

  • SQL, T-SQL, PL/SQL, XML
  • DTS/SSIS Tools
  • ETL Process
  • C# Programming Language
  • Evaluation
  • Critical Thinking
  • Troubleshooting
  • Planning

You can see that there are two types of skills in the example list.

These are Hard skills and Soft skills.

As a reminder, hard skills are skills you’ve learned that relate directly to your position as an SQL developer.

In essence, what you know about what you do.

Soft skills are aspects of your personality and temperament that you bring to the job and workplace – things like ability to think critically, ability to troubleshoot, and rapport with clients/customers.

Make sure your list strikes an even balance between the two types of skills.

PRO TIP: Take enough time to consider your full skill-set. Even say your skills out loud if you’re having trouble. Sometimes we haven’t stopped to consider what we’re truly good at, though we may know it intuitively.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Your Work History

So you’ve pointed out and emphasized your skills.

Now it’s time to show them in action!

Your work experience section is a crucial part of forming an impression of yourself as a viable candidate for the job.

Potential employers want to know all about your former endeavors and how you’re progressing in your career.

Begin with layout.

Reverse chronological order is the best way to make an impression with your work history, because it places your most recent accomplishments first.

From there, use each job entry to show how you arrived at your current/recent position.

Be sure to include:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

It’s common practice to include dates on your resume, meaning the period you worked at a given job.

But maybe you feel sheepish about a job you held for only a short time, or a long period you went between jobs so you’ll decide to leave dates off your SQL developer resume for fear they will reflect badly on your professional dedication.

That could happen, but keep in mind that you will be asked about dates anyway during an interview. You’ll have to tell the whole truth at some point so be ready with answers!

For each entry, you’ll use 3-5 bullet points to talk about your various roles while on the job.

Power words will help lend action to your descriptions and create the impression of ability and confidence.

Examples for reference:

Yes!

Alpine Solutions | Denver, CO | SQL Developer | October 2016 – Present

  • Design, build, and implement relational databases
  • Test databases for optimal performance
  • Produce documentation on all assigned systems and databases
  • Share knowledge with internal IT teams and make recommendations

No!

Alpine Solutions | SQL Developer

  • Do databases
  • Do tests when needed
  • I keep documents of my work
  • Talk with IT teams when I have to

Why is the first example preferable to the second?

First of all, it contains sufficient detail in the heading. The candidate is upfront about the company details and how long he/she was employed there.

The bullet points demonstrate a healthy skill set in action. Power words support each description.

The second example lacks relevant details, from the particulars of the company to the day-to day tasks performed there.

It’s impossible to gather an accurate impression of the candidate’s abilities from the bullet points provided.

You have to get specific!

PRO TIP: In your work experience section, you’re wanting to provide a snapshot of how you perform as an employee. So highlight roles of note and successes you had while in the position. Remember your goal is to impress!

More About Bots

Some employers require your resume to be scanned by bots for relevant keywords and language.

This is known as an Applicant Tracking System (ATS).

Sometimes it is necessary to use an alternative formatting in order to satisfy scanning bots.

Using paragraphs instead of bullet points for your work history is one option.

Bullet points:

Alpine Solutions | Denver, CO | SQL Developer | October 2016 – Present

  • Design, build, and implement relational databases
  • Test databases for optimal performance
  • Produce documentation on all assigned systems and databases
  • Share knowledge with internal IT teams and make recommendations

Paragraph:

Design, build, and implement relational databases per client specification. Test databases for optimal performance functionality. Produce documentation on all assigned systems and databases.

Another technique would be to use a mixed formatting:

Design, build, and implement relational databases per client specification. Test databases for optimal performance functionality. Produce documentation on all assigned systems and databases.

  • Share knowledge with internal IT teams and make recommendations
  • Helped grow company profitability by 10%

The purpose of using a paragraph is to have the ability to include more keywords in your descriptions. This will help satisfy the requirements of an ATS.

However, more text on your SQL developer resume increases the chance of a hiring manager losing interest while reading.

So it’s a gamble.

We advise sticking with bullet points alone unless you are really concerned about beating an ATS.

Your Education Details

Every resume should include a section about your education, even if you’ve had little or it is irrelevant to your chosen vocation, because education plays an important role in shaping your professional attitude and demeanor.

For many though, you attended college in order to start your career.

Whatever your situation, start by listing the highest level of education you’ve received.

Example: Master’s Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, High School Diploma, etc.

List relevant information like your area of study and the name of the institution you attended.

Include any minor degrees and concentrations.

Consider including your GPA, at least for a time until you’ve built up your work experience.

Example:

Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems (CIS)
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO,
GPA: 3.8
Class of 2011

Also add ways in which you’ve expanded upon your education over time.

Example:

  • “SQL Now,” Professional Workshop, Denver, CO.
  • “Database Functionality,” Conference, Denver, CO.

Additional Sections

If you have a special accomplishment that you feel should be included on your SQL developer resume, consider adding an additional section to highlight it.

A few of the options:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience

You may find yourself in a position of having little or no experience in a new field, but you still need a resume.

Fortunately, there are a few techniques you can use to produce an effective SQL developer resume that will demonstrate your professional value.

You’ll need to highlight your education first of all because if you lack experience your education credentials are going to give your viability a boost!

Start by moving your education section so that it follows your summary.

As you move on to list what jobs you have held, be sure to highlight skills and roles that may prove relevant to your current pursuit.

For instance, since you have chosen to become an SQL Developer, consider how your former jobs may have prepared you for that role.

Did you ever hold a job that required working with databases of any kind?
Organization?

Filing?

Troubleshooting?

These things count as valuable experience!

Remember This

Always include your contact information!

Space

Start with a killer summary, then a compelling work history, and finally your educational achievements. Following these guidelines is an effective way to utilize the space you have.

Power word usage

Power words will give your language strength. Be sure to use a variety of them!

A trusted proofreader

Even the best writers require proofreaders. It is a sure way of spotting mistakes before sending your resume in. You want to present a polished document.

Don’t Do This

No first person language/expressions

It feels natural to use first person language and expressions, especially when talking about your own skills – but remember that doing so is considered unprofessional in this context.

A single page is all it takes

You’re probably not a CEO, so you should only require one page to list your skills and experience. Remember that more words do not make a resume better.

Don’t be repetitive

Repetition is to be avoided. You want to keep your language varied and focused. Saving time through repeating yourself will do you no favors in the long run.

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Fonts and formatting

Keep your fonts and formatting simple and to the point. Do not select an outlandish font or go with “creative” formatting. Produce a clean, easy-to-read resume.

Some Helpful Tools:

Power Words

  • Designed
  • Tested
  • Produced
  • Shared
  • Performed
  • Employed
  • Executed
  • Created
  • Gathered
  • Improved
  • Implemented
  • Analyzed
  • Compiled
  • Formulated

Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
SQL, T-SQL, PL/SQL, XML Evaluation
DTS/SSIS Tools Critical Thinking
ETL Process Troubleshooting
C# Programming Language Planning
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