Resume Template: Data Analyst

You’ve got all the skills, now you need to show them off in a killer Data Analyst resume.
Data analysis is key to the growth of any company or enterprise. Pertinent data must be collected, correlated, and mined for relevant information which can be leveraged to produce profits and map trends. You’ve chosen this field because you excel at distilling large quantities of information down to the essentials of what is going to help your client or employer. This is a field ripe with opportunity and for taking pride in your work. After all, it is through your efforts that the dreams and aspirations of business owners, entrepreneurs, and management teams will come to fruition. So to help you on the way, we’ve put together some guidelines for creating your own resume. In it you will present your own relevant data to be examined by potential employers and clients. So where to begin?

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample data analyst resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best data analyst resume you possibly can.

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Data Analyst Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Bill Gordon
[email protected]
1 (919) 225-9091
Raleigh, NC 27606
linkedin.com/billgordon

Summary Statement:

Data Analyst: Skilled Data Analyst with demonstrable background in growing business revenue through proficient interpretation of market and financial data and delivering solutions to business owners and executives. Accustomed to high-performance work environments and working within a team. History of taking initiative on designing new methods for growth and efficiency through streamlined reporting and statistical analysis.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Sales and Marketing Strategies
  • Research
  • Data Collection/Mining
  • Statistical Computing
  • MS Excel
  • Critical Thinking
  • Problem Solving
  • Communication
  • Analytical Reasoning

Professional Experience:

Coral Communications | Raleigh, NC
Data Analyst | November 2016 – Present

  • Utilize statistical methods to analyze and translate data
  • Produce weekly reports from data
  • Analyze company sales and advertising strategies
  • Provide alternative strategies to grow company profits
  • Saw company value and revenue increase by 10% during tenure

Fastline Communications | Raleigh, NC
Data Analyst | January 2014 – September 2016

  • Worked with management to produce new methods of digital reporting
  • Complied performance data for sales team with focus on growing company efficiency
  • Helped develop new marketing strategies based on market/industry research
  • Presented management with potential strategies and models for business growth

DNR Group | Greensboro, NC
Data Analyst | June 2010 – December 2013

  • Mined company data for key metrics relevant to company priorities
  • Created reports from data in MS Excel for managers
  • Updated client data systems
  • Assisted IT team in developing detailed business specifications
  • Interpreted company reports to determine effectiveness of current processes and strategies

Education/Certifications

Bachelor of Science in Statistics and Analytics The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC,
Class of 2010

Formatting

Data analysis requires assembling order out of chaos.

There is a certain way you go about your work-specific methods you use to get the results you’re looking for.

Likewise, a good resume requires good formatting.

A resume today is not like a resume of yesterday. We inhabit an ever-changing working landscape, and technologies are advancing at a rapid pace.

Many employers now use scanning bots to search resume submissions for relevant keywords and appropriate language.

So this is something to keep in mind when writing your own resume (more on bots later!).

Did you know that a hiring manager spends an average of 6 seconds looking over a resume?

Not much time at all!

This is another reason to get your resume formatted correctly.

Reverse chronological order is the proper layout to use for a resume. It places your most recent position and experience first.

The reader will not have to dig deep to find out what you’ve been doing lately.

Use a simple and clearly legible font as well.

Part of what makes a resume readable and scannable is good use of white space. So make certain your columns, text, and bullet lists are evenly spaced on the page.

Writing a Resume Summary

It is quite important that the content at the top of your resume page immediately grabs the attention of the reader.

You will use a 2-3 sentence summary of your expertise points to accomplish this.

The summary acts as your introduction – your opening statement that sets the tone for the rest of your data analyst resume.

It needs to be a curated collection of your best skills.

A good summary will demonstrate your value as a candidate.

PRO TIP: It used to be commonplace to begin a resume with a statement of objective – what you are seeking in a position. However, this is now an outdated method and considered unprofessional. Your goal is to emphasize your best skill points right off the bat. Show them why you’re the best candidate.

To learn the differences between an effective summary and a weak summary, see the examples below:

Yes!

Skilled Data Analyst with demonstrable background in growing business revenue through proficient interpretation of market and financial data and delivering solutions to business owners and executives. Accustomed to high-performance work environments and working within a team. History of taking initiative on designing new methods for growth and efficiency through streamlined reporting and statistical analysis.

No!

I am a Data Analyst good at interpreting data. Can work with a team. I can also design new methods to make your business better. I am looking for a position with flexible hours and good benefits.

Both examples read well, but one is superior.

Why?

The first summary is a comprehensive breakdown of the candidate’s skills and expertise points.

We learn in what performance areas the candidate excels. We are given specifics.

The second summary example lacks definition and is far too general.

The candidate has included first person language and an objective at the end, both of which you want to avoid when drafting your own summary.

Notice also that the first example includes strong power words, which demonstrate skill and ability.

Areas of Expertise/Key Accomplishments

The next part of your resume is intended to punctuate your summary by highlighting your skills.

Think of this section as covering your Key Accomplishments, or Areas of Expertise.

As you write your resume, keep in mind that it is your skills that set you apart from other candidates vying for the job.

You may have more experience in a certain area of data analysis that another applicant is lacking – so you want to be sure to point it out on your resume!

Your Areas of Expertise should be a bulleted list.

Example:

  • Sales and Marketing Strategies
  • Research
  • Data Collection/Mining
  • Statistical Computing
  • MS Excel
  • Critical Thinking
  • Problem Solving
  • Communication
  • Analytical Reasoning

As you can see in the example, your list should be a combination of two types of skills, hard skills and soft skills.

What’s the difference?

Hard skills pertain to your field – skills particular to data analysis. Perhaps you learned them during your education or on the job.

Just make sure to include all relevant hard skills!

Soft skills are talents particular to your personality and temperament. Are you skilled at critical thinking, troubleshooting, or communication?

These are soft skills.

PRO TIP: For help in compiling your expertise list, talk to coworkers or former employers and managers to get an idea of your skills, particularly soft skills, which can sometimes prove challenging to pinpoint.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Your Work Experience

It goes without saying that you’ll need to include a work history on your resume.

In fact, it is the very heart of a resume. It is how you demonstrate your skills in action to a potential employer.

But there are a few things to get right when writing out your work experience.

You will not need to include every job you’ve ever worked, just those positions relevant to your field in data analysis.

You might also lack experience in your chosen career, but we will discuss that later on.

Let’s start with layout.

Remember that we’re using reverse chronological order.

So this will place your most recent job first in your work history section.

A hiring manager will be able to see in short order where you stand on your career path.

After listing your most recent position, work backwards through your experience.

As you draft your work history, be sure to include:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

It is prudent to include your dates of employment in the heading for every position.

You may be uncomfortable doing this, either because you only worked a job for a short time, or because you have significant gaps of time between periods of employment.

If this pertains to you, you might make the choice to leave dates off your data analyst resume.

However, you should know that you will most likely be asked about missing dates in an interview. Employers will want to know all about lengths of employment and gaps of time between jobs –so be prepared to give answers.

Use 3-5 bullet points to list the tasks and day-to-day responsibilities of each job position.

See the examples below for reference:

Yes!

Coral Communications | Raleigh, NC | Data Analyst | November 2016 – Present

  • Utilize statistical methods to analyze and translate data
  • Produce weekly reports from data
  • Analyze company sales and advertising strategies
  • Provide alternative strategies to grow company profits
  • Saw company value and revenue increase by 10% during tenure

No!

Data Analyst | November 2016 – Present

  • Look at data
  • Make reports sometimes
  • Company sale and advertising
  • Grow company profits

Let’s look closely at these examples.

In the first example, all pertinent data concerning the nature of the position is included in the heading.

The example demonstrates ability and accomplishment. Each bullet point contains sufficient detail and begins with a relevant and effective power word.

The example that follows is quite poor, leaving crucial information out of the position heading.

The bullet points are vague, lacking definition and power.

Remember, it is no good writing a work history if you leave out all the relevant information!

PRO TIP: Power words are important tools to use when building your work history section. Check the job description for power word ideas. Chances are your potential employer has included words you can use to strengthen your bullet points.

Bots and Formatting

Time for more information concerning scanning bots.

Bots function within an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). They evaluate resumes based upon their keyword usage and overall language.

If your potential employer is using an ATS, you may consider using an alternative format for your work experience section.

You can try using paragraphs instead of bullet points.

Typical formatting:

Coral Communications | Raleigh, NC | Data Analyst | November 2016 – Present

  • Utilize statistical methods to analyze and translate data
  • Produce weekly reports from data
  • Analyze company sales and advertising strategies
  • Provide alternative strategies to grow company profits
  • Saw company value and revenue increase by 10% during tenure

Alternative paragraph format:

Utilize statistical methods to effectively analyze and translate data. Produce weekly reports from all relevant data. Analyze company sales and advertising strategies, providing alternative strategies to grow company profits.

Why do this exactly?

A paragraph allows you to fit in more keywords and relevant language, which scanning bots will appreciate.

You could even use a mixed formatting, with limited bullet points to emphasize accomplishments or tasks of note:

Utilize statistical methods to effectively analyze and translate data. Produce weekly reports from all relevant data. Analyze company sales and advertising strategies.

  • Provide alternative strategies to grow company profits.
  • Saw company value and revenue increase by 10% during tenure.

However, a significant downside to this approach is that it impedes readability.

Paragraphs take longer to read.

So unless you are overly concerned about an ATS impeding your data analyst resume’s progress, we advise adhering to bullet points only.

Writing Your Education Section

Your education is an important part of your history and career. You gained valuable knowledge and most likely made useful professional connections.

So you definitely want to include your education credentials on your data analyst resume.

Begin with your highest level of education.

Example: Master’s Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, High School Diploma, etc.

List your field of study and the school/university/college you attended.

Include concentrations and minor degrees. You can also add your date of graduation.

Though it will become less relevant as you progress through your career, consider listing your GPA to help boost your value starting out.

Example:

Bachelor of Science in Statistics and Analytics
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC,
GPA: 3.4
Class of 2010

Workshops or additional professional training you have received should certainly be included in this section.

Example:

  • “Data Today,” Professional Workshop, Charleston, SC
  • “Analyzing Trends,” Online Tutorial

Additional Sections

Maybe there is an accomplishment you have that isn’t relevant to the rest of your resume content.

You can still include it!

Just add an additional section.

Example:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience

So you are ready to land a great job as a data analyst, but you have a problem: little to no experience.

If this is you, do not be discouraged! You can still write a great resume that will help you advance in your chosen career.

However, we suggest making a few changes to your layout.

Think about moving your education details under your opening summary.

(You can find New Graduate and Entry Level resume templates here.)

Your education is going to go a long way in selling your value as a candidate if you lack relevant experience.

You’ll still need to write a work history section even with no direct experience in data analysis.

The task is to tailor what work experience you have to be as relevant as possible to the position you’re seeking.

For instance, maybe you once held a job that required organization and sales.

Perhaps you have experience with managing profits, scheduling, or managing inventory.

Skills like these could very well be relevant to achieving your professional goals.
Carefully consider what work experience you do have. Don’t leave out any important skills!

Tips to Remember

Sometimes the fine details slip through the cracks, so here are some reminders.

Always include your contact information

The most well-written resume will do little good if they can’t contact you to set up an interview. So write down your LinkedIn, your email, or phone number.

Use your space well

We’ve shown you how to format a resume that will pack a punch! Start with a good summary, followed by an impressive work history, and wrap up with your education details (or an additional section).

Use power words

Strong language is effective language. Power words help you to achieve maximum readability with your resume. They lend your descriptions power and a sense of momentum. Use them well!

Use a proofreader

It can never hurt to have a second set of eyes look over your writing. Using a proofreader can make all the difference. They will almost certainly catch little mistakes you’ve missed.

Remember the “Dont’s”

Keep these things in mind as you’re finishing up:

Don’t use first-person language/expressions

Use of “I” or “me” on your resume distracts from the true focus of it all: your skills. It may seem impersonal or feel incorrect, but resist the urge to write in the first person. Your resume is not a letter.

Don’t go over a single page

All of your relevant experience and skill points should fit nicely into one page. No need to exceed that length. It may take some editing of your language, but that’s a good thing.

No repetitive language

Sometimes it can be a challenge to keep your writing fresh. So take time to think about how you are wording your information. Good power word selection will help you keep things varied.

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Avoid odd fonts and formatting

We all want our resumes to stand above the rest. But using a weird font or alternative formatting will not help you achieve this. Readability is your main goal. So use a sensible font and grounded formatting.

Some Helpful Tools:

Data Analyst Resume Power Words

  • Utilized
  • Produced
  • Analyzed
  • Worked
  • Compiled
  • Helped
  • Presented
  • Mined
  • Created
  • Updated
  • Assisted
  • Interpreted

Data Analyst Resume Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
Sales/Marketing Strategies Problem Solving
Research Critical Thinking
Data Collection/Mining Communication
Statistical Computing Analytical Reasoning
MS Excel Efficient
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